Archive for the ‘Page 3: Earlier Work’ Category

Knowledge Bust

Posted: December 14, 2009 in Page 3: Earlier Work

1993
Dimensions: 41 by 40 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel, with wood cube.

One of the first paintings of the artist.
This bust, which looks like a gumball machine, has a little cube sticking out of his head. The bust is painted on wood panel with slits in it and with the cube sticking out, but it is all perfectly seamless. Fine craftsmanship can also express a state of mind.

Act of God

Posted: December 14, 2009 in Page 3: Earlier Work

1991
Dimensions: 68 by 49 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood, with wood block as nose.

“Act of God” is written across the top of this guy who seems to be delighted with himself. A thumbs up at the upper left would seem to confirm this but a black plane at the bottom right takes you aback. Out of utmost respect to God, the artist says that he did the best he could: the nose was chiseled out of the wood frame (see upper left) and pasted on man’s face.

Admitted Adultery

Posted: December 11, 2009 in Page 3: Earlier Work

1990
Dimensions: 74 by 64 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel.

One of the first paintings the artist did. Obviously the artist has had a feeling for geometry since the very beginning, which is clearly demonstrated by the countless planes comprising the female subject and by the large cube stuck in her hair. But more importantly says the artist: “I was beginning to take art very seriously and the painting shows my intention to express something that is beautiful on the whole. A young artist when starting out often turns to gratuitous displays of pathos, even ugliness, in an attempt to express a sense of seriousness, if not importance, in respect to his work.”

2002
Dimensions: 110 by 94 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel.

The flower seems to be in a field but it is not in the ground of this field directly. It is in a clay pot set on the ground, which makes it stand out (even isolates it) in respect to a more normal setting. The flower is, however, connected directly to the sun, seen in their spontaneous forms that resemble each other so closely. A great amount of heat seems to be generated by the sun, for better and for worse: the leaf of the potted plant is blue with red hot tip, yet the plant stands firm with a brilliant white flower.

The Staggering Coast Line

Posted: December 11, 2009 in Page 3: Earlier Work

2001
Dimensions: 180 by 111 cm.
Media: Paint on canvas with a sheet of wood.

Blue sea, white sand, green plains…out of order. A couple small sheets of wood were stripped off this painting, leaving traces. These traces had to be balanced, visually, by a piece of the remaining sheet of wood being torn off at the corner (in the form similar to that of the traces). This remaining sheet of wood draws the viewer’s eyes from the upper left down to the bottom right over a cascade of rectangular forms. In real life—in a perfectly natural setting—driftwood can be so out of place yet so in place at the same time.

The Yellowing Chapel

Posted: December 11, 2009 in Page 3: Earlier Work

2002
Dimensions: 98 by 76 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel.

This composition offers no perspective as one would expect in a true-to-life portrayal of a real life scene, and the image that is rendered is only, in large part, due  to that which has been chiselled out of the wood support. The idea here, according to the artist, is not to create an image of something in nature, but a thing in an of itself, something more real if you will. To note: the paint of the “yellowing chapel”, on wood support, is intensively scraped into. A window and door is formed from this intense activity. A tree (dead center) largely blots out the integrity of the chapel’s architecture, adding to the tension. And at the center of the tree’s foliage: a black spot–a reference point so to speak–for whatever white of the chapel remains. At the top, a cross with an accompanying sun is presented in incongruous fashion in relation to the chapel’s bright white spire. Around the painting: the entire center of a grey sheet of cardboard has been torn out, its remains offering a perimeter to the painting. The original white painted surface of this grey cardboard has all been scraped away, except for one portion at the upper right that simulates a cloud, a white cloud for all that that’s worth.

Cravin’ Hearts

Posted: December 11, 2009 in Page 3: Earlier Work

2002
Dimensions: 78 by 57 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood.

Is it possible to nail paint to a frame without damaging it? Not any more likely than it is to cover up the sight of a knot of wood that has been hammered smack dab out of the center of a painting’s wood support, but which is still holding on. An unlimited love that has been broken off by parents because the lovers were too young may be too much to accept without any word whatsoever to say on their part. Take heart. The word here is carved in wood.

Opening House

Posted: December 11, 2009 in Page 3: Earlier Work

1992
Dimensions: 50 by 41 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel, with pieces of wood.

For a psychologist, a house is representative of a person’s head or face and is indicative of how one feels about life. Consequently, the artist often uses the house as a symbol for life in general. In this scene we see soft alluring pastel colors, a fence which needs mending, cute stepping stones, and a small house opening at the seams.

M. Monroe Mockery

Posted: December 11, 2009 in Page 3: Earlier Work

SONY DSC1982
Dimensions: 49 by 39 cm, framed.
Media: Black and white photograph.

Unsolicited street scene: Posters of Marylyn in a shop window show her tilting her head and laughing in the direction of a bent-over old man walking by. Said to be a victim of unrequited love in real life, the woman was known for troubling behavior.

Newspaper Girls

Posted: December 11, 2009 in Page 3: Earlier Work

SONY DSC1982
Dimensions: 48 by 39 cm, framed.
Media: Black and white photograph.

Two Black newspaper girls selling papers.
Natural pose. Comment of the artist: ” I remember them being so appropriately framed by a newspaper cart–that added a great amount of charm. And as a former newspaper boy I remember, having noticed their very finite stock, being touched by their modest venture. As I prepared to click the picture, the standing girl lowered her head.”

1981
Dimensions: 49 by 39 cm, framed.
Media: color photograph.

Unsolicited scene taken in a museum. According to the artist: “I came into a room in the St. Louis Art Museum and saw a little boy in a red shirt that had the same color of shirt as the painting in the background. He swung around and stood before me as you see him. I noticed there were buckets to catch water from a leak in the ceiling. I immediately saw the irony and named the photo “Which One Is Not a Work of Art?””

Nailed

Posted: May 8, 2009 in Page 3: Earlier Work

2002
Dimensions: 90 by 80 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel with metal frame.

This is meant to be a portrait. A notable element is the ancient nail that has been hamered into the wood panel at the upper left.

Close up:

Challenged Painter

Posted: May 10, 2008 in Page 3: Earlier Work

2005
Dimensions: 133 by 79, framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel, and sculpted wood frame.

The frame has been broken apart and put back together with fine screws–layer by layer when necessary. The wood panel (wall that the painter is working on), is grossly fractured but is being repaired by the painter. A simulated crack, drawn with pencil runs down and into the pencil lines that illustrate the hat, holding the head in suspension as the head itself is not attached to the body. The painter is sketched with pencil dug into the wood panel and secured with a transparent spray fixative.

Close up 1

Close up 2

Close up 3

2002
Dimensions: 75 by 37 by 10 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on canvas in box frame with black plastic corner supports.

The paint runs under the black corner supports. The canvas flows out the top in the corners. The canvas was large enough in its frame allowing for many contours in it. Wood structures are attached to the canvas.

Dirty T Shirt_One

Posted: May 9, 2008 in Page 3: Earlier Work

2000
Dimensions: 41 by 33 cm, framed.
Media: T Shirt over wood panel, and under glass.

While working, the artist cleans his brushes and hands on T shirts. When they are suitable for framing, he frames them under glass and puts his signed T Shirt logo at the bottom right.

2001
Dimensions: 45 by 45 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel.

The painted surface of the wood panel has been ripped away in parts leaving raw wood.

Stained Work Cloth

Posted: May 8, 2008 in Page 3: Earlier Work

2005
Dimensions: 55 by 45 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel, with cloth wood structure.

The frame is doubled. There is a work cloth applied to a structure that adds relief in one direction while the doubled frames offers relief in a direction perpendicular to it.

2004
Dimensions: 89 by 75 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel.

Massive raw oak frame. The wood support panel has been cut along the lines of the branch and a certain relief has been created from the fact that the cut panel was able to be manipulated. The paint has been scraped out to create the natural wood color.

2004
Dimensions: 60 by 60 cm, framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel.

The wood panel is ripped out around the “mask” to expose the bare wood. A knot hole in the frame has been dug out and the knot set at the bottom of the frame. The bits and pieces of the wood coming from this operation are stuck (with thick varnish) to the inner field of the frame leading around to where the knot has been set.

What Life’s About

Posted: November 13, 1988 in Page 3: Earlier Work

1988
Dimensions: 35 by 45 cm., framed.
Media: Paint on wood panel.

 

You know, and I know, what life’s about.